CME Sessions at EANM’08

EANM’08 – CME Session XII

Neuroimaging
October 15, 2008, 08:00 – 09:30
Recent Updates on Dementia

Moderator: K. Tatsch (Munich)


Speakers:
extended
abstract
F. Nobili (Genova):
Mild Cognitive Impairment
C.C. Rowe (Melbourne):
Amyloid Imaging
Z. Walker (London):
Lewy Body Dementia


Educational objectives:

  1. Learn about new developments regarding the concept of mild cognitive impairment.
  2. Understand the current and future role of imaging amyloid-beta in Alzheimer’s disease and its discrimination from other neurodegenerative dementias.
  3. Adopt knowledge about the role of dopaminergic imaging in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of Lewy body dementia.


Summary:

This continuing education session is directed towards nuclear medicine physicians, radiologists and technologists who perform and interprete neuroimaging studies in patients with dementia. It will provide an update on recent developments in three different fields, each which major impact for clinical practice.
Functional imaging of glucose metabolism and blood flow but also techniques directed against more specific molecular targets play an increasing role in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) with prediction of the conversion to Alzheimer’s disease being one of the key issues. The lecture will address the role of imaging in this context and inform on new developments regarding the MCI concept. The emerging role of imaging techniques directly targeting amyloid-beta plaques in the early and the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease will be covered by another talk highlighting the strength and weaknesses of this approach. Finally, the role of imaging presynaptic dopaminergic functions in the diagnostic work up of patients with suspected Lewy body dementia will be addressed comparing clinical diagnoses, imaging results and autopsy findings.


Key Words:

Neurodegenerative dementia, mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s disease, Lewy body dementia, amyloid plaque imaging, dopaminergic system, glucose metabolism

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